A suitable ride with low mileage

Cars and wives both serve a purpose.

Readership: Men; Single Men;
Theme: Risk Assessment
Length: 1,200 words
Reading Time: 4 minutes

I want to convey a little story, and then I’ll draw an analogy about picking a wife wisely.

Shopping for a Worthy Ride

Most automobiles these days have a limited service life of approximately 20 years or 200,000 miles (320,000 km.). Can you imagine what would happen to share prices if GM or Ford designed all of their trucks to have 25 year minimum service life?  Some people can make them last that long through anal retentive attention to maintenance, but that is different than military grade overengineering to the extent that the average buyer can abuse the truck and still expect decades of service.

Are there any cars like that on the market?

Yes. Recently I bought a 1999 Land Cruiser.

The main reason I wanted to buy an old Land Cruiser is so that I could go off road camping in the nature reserves with my sons.

Land Cruisers of that era have the reputation in the states as an overpriced SUV. This is because Toyota did not cut costs by reducing the robustness of the parts used. Everything on it is heavy, and parts cost an arm and a leg if you buy OEM, which with a vehicle like a Land Cruiser, you’ll want to do because they last twice as long as the aftermarket parts.  When you get into one, even a 23 year old model, you see the thought that went into engineering them.

Models made before 1997, which was the last year of the FJ80, had solid axles front and rear.  The FJ100 series ran from 1997 to 2007 with a solid rear axle and independent front suspension.

1997 FJ80 Toyota Land Cruiser

They have options for front, center, and rear locking differentials.  Factory rear lockers were an option for 1998-1999 model years, after which they switched over to a braking system called A-Trac to deal with the open differential issue when off camber. The 100s never came with a front locker, but it can be added aftermarket if you need it. I chose to purchase one older than the 2000 model year because I wanted the factory locker in the rear and I didn’t care so much about the A-Trac braking system.

I am a little jealous of the Land Cruiser options overseas.  There is a diesel engine option that makes for an amazing rig that did not make it to the States.

The thing that impressed me the most was the size of the car, the size of the engine, and the weight, all of which are much bigger than it appears in photos. They are built to have a minimum 25 year service life and with the proper maintenance will last a half million miles. They also have some very unique and useful features. There are little things like oversized wheel bearings that you can pull out and repack with grease, zerks on the drive line that you grease every 10k miles or so, a fully boxed frame and oversized CV axles (mine are 1.37 inches in diameter which is massive).  The skid plate on it is noticeably heavier than the one on my Tundra, even though it covers about 3/4s the area, and the difference in the gauge of steel used is readily evident to the naked eye.

All of the above is why I fell in love with the Land Cruisers and ended up busting my budget to get a good one that has been fairly well maintained with 230k miles on it. The transmission shifts are almost imperceptible and the engine idles as smooth as my GMC with 53k miles on it.  It’s crazy.

I watched a video of a guy selling his 1997 FJ80.  It had been lifted, had lots of aftermarket off road upgrades, was in very good shape and had 250k miles on it and he was selling it for $36,000.  There is an ardent fanbase for these old Toyotas.

I did not pay anywhere near $20k for my J100, but I’m hoping that it will appreciate similarly because the features it has are desirable for those who are off road enthusiasts. As I continue to work on it and they become harder to find, it should at least maintain its value.

1999 FJ100 Toyota Land Cruiser

The Analogy of Two Rides

Since my head is preoccupied with used cars, I found that looking for a wife is very much like buying a used vehicle. It’s uncanny how similar the two endeavors are.

Year, make, and model matter in most cases.  Her upbringing, family history, and where she comes from matters.

How the vehicle has been used and maintained matters.  Her past history and how she’s maintained herself matters.

Researching a used vehicle thoroughly to see the service history helps mitigate the risk.  Researching a woman through talking with those who know her and doing your own vetting help mitigate the risk.

All used vehicles have some wear from use, but low mileage inspected vehicles tend to be a good choice.  All women have relationship wear because people sin against each other, so even a young virgin will have issues to overcome, but they’re usually minor and more easily dealt with.

When the vehicle is for sale, the owner does things to minimize the flaws.  When a woman is trying to impress/attract a man and/or get married, she does things to minimize her flaws.

When a buyer is bargaining for a deal, he’ll emphasize the flaws. A wise man will focus more on a woman’s flaws and hangups to help himself see her more clearly and avoid pedestalizing her.

2000 Toyota Land Cruiser interior

When buying a car, you should have an idea of what the car will be used for, and whether it will perform well in that capacity. For example, a reliable car is needed to drive to work every day. A comfortable car is preferred for taking long road trips. A truck is useful for small businesses and farming. A durable 4×4 is needed for off-road exploration. A classic car is used for car shows and cruising. A muscle car will win races. Likewise, when a man has a clear vision of his purpose in life, he will be better able to choose a woman who can fit into that lifestyle and support his mission well.

When you own the vehicle and drive it a bit you will see all the issues it has, especially if it has higher mileage. When you marry a woman, all the pretenses evaporate and you are going to see all her flaws.

Once you own the vehicle, regular maintenance will keep it running well and meeting your needs.  Once you marry, the regular maintenance of the woman is required so she knows how to be the helper you need.

You have to ride in the vehicle regularly to keep the lubricants in important parts moving so the parts continue to function well.  You have to ride on the wife regularly to keep the bid-response cycle in action so the relationship continues to function well.

Not all rides are the same. Choose wisely.

This entry was posted in Attraction, Building Wealth, Calculated Risk Taking, Choosing a Partner or Spouse, Conserving Power, Courtship and Marriage, Discernment, Wisdom, Fundamental Frame, Headship and Patriarchy, Introspection, Male Power, Models of Success, Moral Agency, Organization and Structure, Power, Purpose, Relationships, Self-Concept, Stewardship, Strategy, The Power of God, Vetting Women. Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to A suitable ride with low mileage

  1. Joe2 says:

    “Researching a used vehicle thoroughly to see the service history helps mitigate the risk.”

    It might be helpful if we could get something like a CARFAX report for women.

    Liked by 1 person

    • whiteguy1 says:

      The great thing is, the self reporting is actually pretty great with girls compared to car owners, it just has a different name instead of ‘GIRLFAX’. The youngin’s call it “social media”. It has a bunch of different interfaces, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, TikTok (or as someone calls it, Chik-Tok).

      Like

    • thedeti says:

      The ho-fax

      Like

  2. Lastmod says:

    In November 2020, I bought a car… the first car I have owned since 1997. I wanted a Chevrolet Impala, high trim level. They wanted 36K for it, and all the Chevrolet dealers I went to wouldn’t budge. If I was going to spend that much for a new car, I would have just went to Honda or Toyota immediately. GM still thinks its 1968 and Americans “love” their high quality, well built, and well designed cars.

    I ended up getting a Volkswagen, and the biggest reason why was because the car came standard with a manual transmission, sport suspension, and a decent turbo-charged engine. High selling point. Also the car was priced fairly and I knew I wasn’t going to have problems with it after a year. I am very pleased with it. The reviews of the Impala online and in blogs say, “If you are going to spend this much money for a new car… go to Honda or Toyota. It will lose half its value in about two years.”

    If Chrysler actually built mid range sedans, I would have gone there first. Only a minivan and the 300 are left from this once proud product, and Dodge only makes the Charger / Challenger. I did not want a sports / muscle car. Ford doesn’t make sedans anymore either.

    I did honestly want to buy “American” first, but the price and value for what you get vs. reliablity? A shame. There is still a huge market for a mid level sedan that actually runs for more than 100K and is reliable. The US automakers since the end of the 1970’s overall have been struggling with this concept.

    Women my age are probably as expensive as that Impala, BTW…

    Liked by 2 people

    • thedeti says:

      GM has been building crappy cars for about the last 30 years. I’ll never buy another GM product ever again.

      Like

      • Red Pill Apostle says:

        I have replaced all of our regular use vehicles with Toyotas in the past 2 years. The only remaining non-Toyota vehicle is an old GMC that I used for camping and hunting that I am going to sell. But it needs a couple repairs, a sensor on the transfer case and a new ac compressor, before I can sell it, which seems about right.

        Liked by 1 person

      • thedeti says:

        I had a GMC Sierra 1500 I bought very used for about $4500. I had it a couple of years before the brakes failed – twice – and it ended up needing $2800 in repairs. I traded it in for a Camry for my daughter.

        I loved that truck. But it was getting to be like my second serious college/law school GF. High maintenance, expensive, gas guzzler, always in the shop, didn’t work well, unreliable, and more trouble than it was worth.

        Like

    • Red Pill Apostle says:

      “There is still a huge market for a mid level sedan that actually runs for more than 100K and is reliable.”

      Hyundai, Honda and Toyota have figured out a way to make a profit in this segment while making cars that last 200k miles with proper maintenance and get decent fuel economy. Almost all of the vehicles that these automakers sell in the US are made in the US. It makes a man question what the domestic auto maker’s leadership is doing.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. thedeti says:

    Let’s see. Continuing on this analogy.

    The Land Cruiser is an extremely well constructed vehicle with a very long service life. It’s designed to be driven, and driven hard. It’s designed for heavy use, and multiple ownership doesn’t matter as long as the prior owners took good care of it.

    Most vehicles aren’t that well constructed. Their parts are not nearly as heavy duty. This product requires more attention and care, not only by its owner(s), but it must care for itself. There are a lot of factory recalls that the factory carefully conceals and does not report. The product itself must present itself for factory repair. Typically, the product will not submit itself for repair until after the issue causing the recall has caused a great deal of damage.

    There are a lot of manufacturing defects. You have to look for those carefully.

    And there is a LOT of prior owner misuse and abuse. As we all well know. abuse and misuse are not covered under the Maker’s warranty.

    Not only have prior owners abused the product; most such products regularly abuse themselves. They expose themselves to the elements; use the wrong fuels, run themselves on fumes; don’t change fluids on time or properly; and don’t repair or replace worn or damaged parts. They use a lot of poorly built aftermarket add ons that don’t fit, don’t look good, and don’t work for their intended purposes. Most such aftermarket parts cannot be removed without damaging the vehicle. The Maker also does not cover these under His warranty.

    There are no reporting systems for this product’s defects and prior uses/abuses. The only way to find them is for the buyer to look for them and to know what to look for. The product usually provides a great deal of information about itself either through social media; or through allowing a series of drivers to use it. Mostly, a driver considering purchasing the product must assume all risks. The Maker’s warranty has almost always expired. Once he purchases, he cannot abandon or trade in the product except at enormous cost.. This is why most men choose to rent or lease them instead of purchasing them.

    Liked by 3 people

    • thedeti says:

      Also, this product is really intended to remain on the showroom floor until a suitable purchaser is found. They are designed for one owner. The dealer is supposed to allow you to get in, sit in it, look at the nice upholstery, and maybe kick the tires. You can feel free to ask lots of questions about it too. The dealer should be happy to answer all your questions. You can even go home, think about it, and come back and see it again on the floor and ask more questions anytime you like.

      You can’t really test drive it though. It’s supposed to stay in the showroom until a prospective buyer likes it enough to buy it and take it home.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bardelys the Magnificent says:

      “The Maker’s warranty has almost always expired. Once he purchases, he cannot abandon or trade in the product except at enormous cost.”

      In other words, they’re sold as-is.

      Like

  4. Oscar says:

    Some people can make them last that long through anal retentive attention to maintenance, but that is different than military grade overengineering to the extent that the average buyer can abuse the truck and still expect decades of service.

    Are there any cars like that on the market?

    As soon as I read that, I thought, “yep. Toyota Hilux (which we sadly don’t get in the States), and Toyota Land Cruiser.” Man, those things are awesome!

    Another factor that makes old Land Cruisers so reliable and long-lasting is the under-stressed engine. The 80-series has a big, 4.5L I-6 that barely makes 185 HP, and gets terrible gas mileage, but because it’s so under-stressed, it can just keep going, and going. If I remember correctly, the valves also do not interfere with the pistons, so if you neglect to change the timing belt, and it breaks, the engine won’t destroy itself.

    The 100-series has a 4.7L V-8, and the 200-series has a 5.7L V-8.

    For those who can’t afford a used Land Cruiser (I wish I’d bought one years ago), the 1st generation Sequoia has a power train very similar to that of the 100-series Land Cruiser, and the 2nd gen is similar to the 200-series. They’re not quite as good, but they’re less expensive.

    Another great option is the Lexus GX470 and GX460. They’re based on the Land Cruiser Prado. Most of them were bought and owned by rich soccer moms whose husbands had them serviced at the Lexus dealership, and have never seen a speck of dirt, so they tend to be in excellent condition.

    They used to be a “best kept secret”, but not anymore, so used prices unfortunately reflect that fact.

    The 4Runner is also based on the Land Cruiser Prado, and is also a great option. I used to have one. Man, I miss it!

    Finally: used, abused, and still truckin’ along.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Red Pill Apostle says:

      Oscar – I have a 100 series with the 4.7L. You are correct that it is an interference engine and Toyota used them for the first gen Sequoia and Tundra, the Lexus GX 470 and Lexus LX 470 (LX is the Lexus branded Land Cruiser). The Land Cruiser and LX are all still made in Japan because they are the flagship vehicles of their brands. Quality control is excellent and it is routine to see the 4.7 with 400-500k miles on the original engines as long as every 90k miles the timing belt/water pump/tensioners are replaced and with those the heater T’s at the back of the engine.

      With the 80 series there is an option for factory lockers on the front and rear differentials. They are not as refined as the 100 series, but have a the reputation of being slightly more capable off road because they have solid front and rear axles, where the 100 series only has the solid rear axle. The reason I didn’t get an 80 series is because $30,000+ is a lot of money for a mechanically sound trail truck.

      My daily is a Tundra with the 5.7 v8. I prefer it over the 4.7 because it nearly doubles the power with similar fuel consumption (I was about to use fuel economy but with those engines “fuel economy” is an oxymoron). It is common to see the 5.7 at 300k or more miles with only the spark plugs and coil packs being replaced every 100k miles as they use a timing chain instead of a belt.

      If the Hilux was available stateside I would have carefully considered one of those too. A mechanic friend did vehicle maintenance on them in South America when he was there on mission work. In the years he was there he only did brakes and oil changes because they never broke and this was with daily use on unpaved roads near 10,000 feet in the Andes.

      Like

      • Oscar says:

        I drove a Hilux in the Middle East, and I can see why they don’t sell it here. The leaf springs are so stiff it bounces down the road, but then, that’s partly why its payload capacity is so high for a compact truck, and why they last so long. Most Americans expect more comfort from their trucks.

        I’d love to have one with the 2.8L I-4 Diesel, but American emissions standards for Diesels are insane. Most countries cut Diesels some slack because they prioritize fuel mileage. I don’t blame manufacturers for not bringing them here.

        Like

      • Red Pill Apostle says:

        I am with you on the diesel Hilux. My county does not test emissions so I could get away with a gray market vehicle and I tend to prioritize longevity over comfort when it comes to vehicles.

        Like

      • Oscar says:

        I suspect that once you loaded a Hilux down with two kids, a truck topper, roof top tent, extra fuel, extra water, tools, camping gear, etc., the ride would smooth out.

        Like

      • Red Pill Apostle says:

        Oscar,

        My Tundra has heavy duty leaf springs in the rear and the ride starts settling down with 600-700 pounds in the bed. The Hilux probably wouldn’t require that much weight, but I would bet it rides much nicer with a load over the rear axle.

        Like

  5. Bardelys the Magnificent says:

    There were a series of TikTok videos a while back of women describing themselves using this analogy. Previous owners (N count), how many miles (times fornicated x 1000), stickers (tattoos), and number of accidents (abortions). Quite interesting, if not horrifying.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Red Pill Apostle says:

      Bardelys,

      This analogy actually works well. A wife who is a virgin on her wedding effectively is a zero mileage vehicle. This would seem to be a decent approximation for her mental state regarding intimacy with her husband.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. lastholdout says:

    “When buying a car, you should have an idea of what the car will be used for, and whether it will perform well in that capacity. For example, a reliable car is needed to drive to work every day. A comfortable car is preferred for taking long road trips. A truck is useful for small businesses and farming. A durable 4×4 is needed for off-road exploration. A classic car is used for car shows and cruising. A muscle car will win races. Likewise, when a man has a clear vision of his purpose in life, he will be better able to choose a woman who can fit into that lifestyle and support his mission well.”

    I have multiple vehicles fitting most of the categories above. If I follow this idea to the full logical extent, it sounds to me like a strong case for polygyny . . . 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Red Pill Apostle says:

      Lastholdout – Keeping a single vehicle well serviced is usually as much work as one man wants to do. Even an easier to maintain vehicle requires regular washing, waxing, and fluid changes. If you happen to neglect one for too long the seals get brittle and start leaking, the tires crack from dry rot and she can give you emissions problems. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • redpillboomer says:

        “Keeping a single vehicle well serviced is usually as much work as one man wants to do. Even an easier to maintain vehicle requires regular washing, waxing, and fluid changes.”

        I got a chuckle out of this line RPA, and thought, “Yup, that’s me!” That’s exactly what I’ve got with my ‘original, going on 33 years now model.’ Like most men, I admire other model’s beauty and appeal, and find myself wondering, “What would it be like to ‘test drive that fine looking set of wheels,’ or maybe even own it?” Then my mind snaps back to reality, “Nope, I’ll admire it out there on the showroom floor or in used car lot, and then drive my trusty vehicle home without a second thought about the cars that momentarily caught my attention with their visual appeal and features.” Keeps my automotive driving life simple and headache free.

        Like

      • caterpillar345 says:

        @redpillboomer,

        I’ll second that. I thought a lot about what kind of vehicle I wanted and then searched long and hard to find it (seriously, I flew to the midwest from the PNW and drove it back). I still love driving it and I plan to drive it until the wheels fall off. I see other vehicles that I think would be fun to drive sometimes but nothing I’d want to drive everyday more than what I have.

        Like

  7. caterpillar345 says:

    With all these vehicle analogies, I wonder what the analogy would be for preferring stick shift over automatic?? This definitely seems like a post for men! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • thedeti says:

      Most women pre-sexual revolution were stickshifts. Gave the driver more control over the vehicle.

      Most women post sex rev are automatic transmissions with 8 forward speeds and computers onboard. That means too many things can go wrong, they need a lot of work and maintenance, and you have less control over your speed and when things shift.

      How’s that?

      Liked by 1 person

      • caterpillar345 says:

        Interesting!

        I’ve thought for some time that there’s no good reason to drive stick anymore unless you just like it – they’re hard to find (especially in new models), they’re equivalently priced (instead of cheaper), they don’t shift as fast as their computer-controlled brethren, they get equivalent (instead of better) fuel economy, etc. But nevertheless I prefer driving vehicles with stick (and have searched high and low to find the ones I’ve got) because I feel more connected to the vehicle and the driving experience (that is, I feel like a driver instead of a passenger in the driver’s seat), I feel I have more control over the vehicle to do what I need it to do, and because it’s a unique and dying skill.

        Even writing that comment out gave me some obvious thought parallels to a relationship…

        This has definitely been an interesting analogy to think about! Thanks RPA!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Bardelys the Magnificent says:

        “Most women post sex rev are automatic transmissions with 8 forward speeds and computers onboard.”

        And when something goes wrong, junk it. No longer worth time, money and effort to repair like in the good ol’ days. Won’t run like new even if you did.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Lastmod says:

    Caterpillar. The Volkswagen Jetta / Golf brand new base models come with a manual (stick) standard. The higher trim lines are automatic and then when you hit the top level trims…… back to manual transmission.

    I believe the Atheon (the luxury sedan of Volswagen) has a manual option.

    Like

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