Millennials Losing Hope

Readership: All;

The speaker in the video is David Hoffman, a filmographer who followed the lives of many noteworthy people (including many artists and musicians), and the historical events of his generation. He has seen a lot of life.

He has an important message to people in general, but especially to Millennials.

In addition to Hoffman’s message, I will add that the prospects for dating (or whatever else is going on nowadays), and marriage are abysmal. I can’t even advise marriage in good faith anymore. It’s that bad!

The church is declining in popularity because, in general, it’s not offering truth in Biblical teaching, and it’s not offering community involvement. In sum, it’s not offering anything of value to the younger generations. (I’m sure there are exceptions, but good luck finding them.)

When I see people like Biden, Clinton, Warren, being held up as presidential candidates, I feel embarrassed for the younger generations.

When I see the likes of Jordan Peterson being idolized, I feel afraid for the future.

When I see reports of how socialism is becoming more acceptable to younger Americans, and the popularity of Bernie Sanders, I have to think, is this the best they can hope for in life?

I hate to admit it, but Millennials have a pretty $h!tty existence.

  • Longer working hours.
  • Higher rent and cost of living.
  • No sense of employer loyalty.
  • No social security solvency.
  • No church community.
  • No serious opportunities for dating/marriage.
  • Shamed out of having any sense of male dignity.
  • Prospects of having a family are slim.
  • No hope of ever owning a house.
  • Constant wars in the news.
  • An increase in mental disorders and suicide.

Remember, the closer you live to the city dump, the less you notice the smell.

I would never tolerate living in such a society. If it were me, I would get the #e11 out of there.

Oh yeah… That’s exactly what I did, fifteen years ago!

Wake up and smell the coffee napalm. Roasties in your cup.

Or as the Boomer’s would say, “Bye bye, Miss American pie…”

Millennials only have a remnant of culture left, so for them, it’s just, “‘Murican pie.”

References

  1. Business Insider (Hillary Hoffower): 50% of millennials have left a job for mental-health reasons (2019-10-8)
  2. Business Insider (Hillary Hoffower and Allana Akhtar): Lonely, burned out, and depressed: The state of millennials’ mental health entering the 2020s (2019-12-17)

About Jack

Jack is a world traveling artist, skilled in trading ideas and information, none of which are considered too holy, too nerdy, nor too profane to hijack and twist into useful fashion. Sigma Frame Mindsets and methods for building and maintaining a masculine Frame
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23 Responses to Millennials Losing Hope

  1. larryzb says:

    Reblogged this on larrysmusings and commented:

    A sad situation for the younger generations.

    Like

  2. lastmod says:

    Longer working hours.
    Higher rent and cost of living.
    No sense of employer loyalty.
    No social security solvency.
    No church community.
    No serious opportunities for dating/marriage.
    Shamed out of having any sense of male dignity.
    Prospects of having a family are slim.
    No hope of ever owning a house.
    Constant wars in the news.
    An increase in mental disorders and suicide.

    Was said the about GenX back in the early 1990’s…..

    I still don’t like how Millennials are still being coddled as the “young generation” the first wave of them is quickly cresting upon their forties. I have been hearing now for twenty plus years how smart, amazing, talented, cool, hip, intelligent, gifted, and great they are.

    I also heard how they were going to solve all the problems because of how “gifted” they are. Guys in my age group “just have to give them a chance”

    (Lights cigarette). They are all things, and so great….they should be able to weather this out. What are their answers? “Orange man bad” and “I deserve”

    When they can balance a checkbook, and quit political slogans…….maybe a few of us will give them some cred. No pity for any of them. More concerned if their employer will give them free stuff and meals for being “cool” all day and I have to actually DO the work. A-holes. All of them

    Like

    • Jack says:

      I think living conditions have slowly gone down since the 70’s. But now it’s gone to the dogs.

      Like

    • feeriker says:

      In sum, [the church i]s not offering anything of value to the younger generations.

      Or any generation, for that matter. Here in the USSA the “church” has signed its institutional death warrant by shutting its doors on Caesar’s orders without even so much as a whimper, whisper of protest, or pretense of resistance. Where it should be taking a stand and being at the forefront of both spiritual leadership and resistance to the forces of Godless tyranny, it’s been a cowardly caboose in hiding. No one respects or needs such an institution.

      Stand by for more harrassment and merciless mockery of churchianity for its disgusting display of cowardice and abandonment of faith. It deserves every ounce of the ugly backlash that’s coming.

      – Longer working hours.
      – Higher rent and cost of living.
      – No sense of employer loyalty.
      – No social security solvency.
      – No church community.
      – No serious opportunities for
      dating/marriage.
      – Shamed out of having any sense of male
      dignity.
      – Prospects of having a family are slim.
      – No hope of ever owning a house.
      – Constant wars in the news.
      – An increase in mental disorders and
      suicide

      Other than the items pertaining to marriage and family and homeownership, I’ve suffered, and continue to suffer at varying times and in varying degrees, every item on this list and I’m no Millennial. I’ve been badly burned once by divorce, and believe me when I say that homeownership is WAAAAAAY overrated. My point is that these signs of dysfunction, decay, and collapse are affecting EVERYBODY – and it’s only gonna get a lot worse before it gets any better.

      Liked by 1 person

      • lastmod says:

        Exactly. My father who didn’t have a college education landed a job with 40 hours, vacation, healthcare, sick pay and owned a home by the time he was 26. No, wasn’t an easy life (every period and generation has its challenges) but myself at the age of 25 was swamped with 75K in debt (private grad school), already priced out of the San Francisco Bay Area housing market, my position at IBM was paying 75K a year in 1985, and by the time 1994 rolled around and I entered it was now paying under 50K, and many were contracted instead of company employees (ie no healthcare, vacation). The national debt was a shocking 4 trillion at the time.

        Our fears, woes and worries fell on deaf ears “You slackers just go to work”

        And Genx’s only saving grace as a whole was that we were latch-key and knew what it was like to come home after school to an empty house. We knew we had to entertain ourselves……countless Saturday mornings in the 1970’s and into the `1980’s…….”saturday morning cartoons were over…time to go out and play until dinner” and it didn’t matter if it was raining, freezing cold or snow…..and parents never asked what we did either.

        We knew how to at least adapt.

        Part of what made the “greatest generation” so admired (WW II) was the fact of their tenacity, their “make do or do without” attitude and their tough as nails personas but a willingness to leave the country better.

        The Millennials I am sure have plenty of unsung decent folks (its a huge age group) but ever since “I” came of age, all I have heard was “this age group coming up is sooooooo different. They are so insightful, talented, smart, amazing, exceptional…………

        Still waiting for this and still tired of them being coddled as ‘children’ or the ‘young generation’ when they are now cresting into their forties.

        Like

    • Elspeth says:

      I still don’t like how Millennials are still being coddled as the “young generation” the first wave of them is quickly cresting upon their forties. I have been hearing now for twenty plus years how smart, amazing, talented, cool, hip, intelligent, gifted, and great they are.

      I have a hard time figuring out exactly who “millennials” even are. Is our 25-year-old daughter a millennial? It depends on who you ask. If they include people in the over 35 age bracket, then you’re right. The “young generation” thing is a complete misnomer. Laughable.

      It’s really just an example of GenXers and older generations not wanting to accept how old we really are. So we call 37-year-olds “young”, LOL. We had a 15-year-old kid when I was 37.

      Meanwhile, a 54-year-old woman at my daughter’s office (whose oldest kid is 16) got offended when our daughter categorized her as “old enough to be my mother”. When the woman pointed out that she didn’t have any children as old as my daughter, my daughter told her, “Yeah, but you’re older than both of my parents. They aren’t even in their 50s yet.”

      It’s that phenomenon that is the driver behind pretending people in their late 30s are “young”.

      Like

  3. cobaltsheath says:

    “Part of what made the “greatest generation” so admired (WW II) was the fact of their tenacity, their “make do or do without” attitude and their tough as nails personas but a willingness to leave the country better.”

    The Greatest Generation is admired because they were mythologized. As people, they weren’t any different than Millennials. Maybe less coddled leading up to WWII, but it’s not as though they enjoyed any inherent strength that other folks don’t have.

    Like

    • feeriker says:

      The Greatest Generation is admired because they were mythologized.

      EXACTLY.

      Much of the current societal and economic decay for which Millennials blame Boomers was in fact set in motion by this so-called “Greatest Generation,” which in reality was anything but.

      Like

    • Jack says:

      The thing I remember most about the Greatest generation (my grandparents generation) was their life stories. Prohibition, immigration, the poverty of the great depression, incredible war stories, jobs they had, what life was like “back then”… Talking to a GG was always fascinating. If anything, they mythologized themselves.

      Like

  4. Scott says:

    No other place to put this, but I thought it might bring a smile to the faces of this crowd. Cut and pasted from my FB page today:

    Mychael is in Great Falls this weekend, as she is every weekend, working in the ER

    This morning, I went out to feed and noticed that several goats had managed to push the gate open because someone did not close it the way I require them to.

    AND there were three new baby goats in the pasture.

    So, I went back up to the house, told the kids to get dressed and come help me. We needed to get the goats back into the pasture without letting the ones that were still there out. This takes planning, tactics and strategy. And a little physical exertion (PE!). If you have ever tried to catch goats, you’ll understand.

    Then, we had to fix the damage to the gate, which is a geometry lesson and because of the way it usually works, an opportunity to talk to them about using your brain and leverage to keep it shut. So, geometry and physics.

    The four-wheeler started to roll back with all of us, the three baby goats and the momma on it, so I got to explain how automatic transmissions work.

    One of the hydrants had siphoned some water back into the hose that leads to the goat water tank and was in danger of freezing the weep valve buried 8 feet into the ground if the weather gets too cold tonight. Got to explain all that to them as well.

    Kenna already knew what to do once we got the goats into the barn, because she is a farm girl.
    The farrier showed up a little early and Kenna and Aleks got to learn about equine feet and why it is so important to keep them trimmed and healthy.

    Later, we loaded up the trash into my truck because we have to haul our own trash out of these backwoods, and the kids asked me how the guy knows how much and whom to charge by weight for what I am dropping off. Since the transfer station does not have a scale like the main dump does, and I have a dump permit with a client number assigned to me, I explained how he estimates the weight of the trash and uses the tag as a reference for billing, something I pay yearly. So estimating and a little about economics.

    Driving back from the transfer station we talked about how road grades work, why the stream is probably going to be low this year, fire risk for summer, etc.

    We also talked about how we might level the round pen and fill it with sand so the horses can have a better surface to train on. What equipment would work, where and how much to buy (that’s calculating the area of a circle, by the way).

    This stuff goes on all day when you have 15 acres, goats, horses, chickens, ducks, dogs, cats, and a donkey. It never ends.

    When I finally sit down to check my email I get a bazillion nasty messages from teachers about missing assignments, missing test scores, missing vocabulary words and I just grin to myself sheepishly. My kids know more about the how the world works because of the life I am giving them than they can learn by being forced to sit still and be lectured for 6 hours.

    There’s a part of me that wants to write them back and ask “what the hell do you think we have been doing all day?” Mychael has a hotter temper than me, so I’ll let her do that.

    I have a PhD. My wife is an RN. We believe education is important. But the educator class –obsessed with credentials and certificates –is full of themselves and in panic mod

    Liked by 2 people

  5. lastmod says:

    Scott:

    That is not really the teachers fault. Its the State and Federal regulations for teaching, and to local state and county offices.

    The rest of you:

    The greatest generation paid a heavy price. Millennials have not. If you consider whining and griping a heavy price…..well, they would be winners. Many never came home. Most spent their childhood in poverty and living hand to mouth. They ended segregation. They came back and built the modern American superpower….although reluctantly, they had no choice…..the world was in ruins. The real myth being hyped is how rough Millennials have it. These ADULTS wouldn’t know what a struggle is…….that is if you consider the barista didn’t make their soy latte hot enough…..therefore they deserve a refund, an apology and a card giving them free drinks for a month. Every one I have supervised has always told me I was “greedy” and “mean” and “stupid” for not implementing every “amazing” idea which they have (99% of their ideas are not amazing, most ideas they have in the workplace are very self-serving). They expect Google pay for Walmart prices in work and quality..

    This is not a defense of GenX (my age group). We were too few in numbers to do anything, and plenty of dead weight here too.

    Like

    • ramman3000 says:

      “That is not really the teachers fault. Its the State and Federal regulations for teaching, and to local state and county offices.”

      It’s both. Don’t absolve teachers of their responsibility. As the primary instructors of our children, they have a duty to do their job well. Nobody forced them to go into a profession for which they are not qualified.

      From “Pew American Trends Panel : Wave 64 (March 19-24, 2020)”, white liberals (who form the largest group of teachers) have a mental health condition in 45.9% of cases. Among 18-29 year olds, that is 34.8%. Those numbers are even higher among women, who make up the bulk of elementary and middle school teachers. The fact is that we have a host of unqualified teachers with mental health conditions teaching our young children.

      From my experience maybe 1 in 5 to 1 in 10 teachers are doing a good job teaching remotely. Unfortunately, none of those are my kids’ teachers. Most teachers are not taking even the slightest initiative.

      Like

  6. lastmod says:

    I was trained to be a schoolteacher. Elementary level (k-6). After student teaching and six months in a classroom for one year (2nd grade) I was exhausted every night. I had a sh*t ton of paperwork for the school, the state and feds that had to constantly be done. I had to teach to tests. I had a gazillion regulations from local county and regional districts to follow. I had every night a few hours of papers and prep to do. All for 27K a year…sure some benefits. I also had to kow-tow to my Union on everything they said. I also had to deal with parents every night….most angry about “what I did” or “what I said” to their “center of the universe, brilliant, amazing, talented, exceptional, gifted” and child.

    I had to fight with fellow teachers for supply. I had to deal with overt sexism by female teachers (which is above 95% of the lower grades). I had to deal with regulations making sure a child had a meal, clothing, glasses in school, and deal with social workers…..calls from angry parents during the day about how “they know best” (well, take your little princess or amazing son out of school, and teach him / her at home).

    I had to teach painful PC nonsense mandated by the state and my Union. I had to break up class for three times a day “med-time” (when the kids…I mean BOYS were given strong behavior modification drugs that you and I would be arrested for if we were taking for recreation, or selling on the street.

    Then, I would be asked “well, your class…a few are not at grade level for reading, for math, for history, the national tests your class did not meet the mark…….”

    The Union would say “just give schools more money” and parents would say “don’t you dare EVER give my kid a bad grade”

    Hence why burnout is high…..good teachers leave and mean psychos who know they’ll never get fired stay.

    It’s a demanding job. A thankless job. But you parents on the outside “know better than anyone”

    Homeschool your kids if its that bad.

    Oh…..you can’t or won’t???????? Hmmmmmmmm

    Like

  7. lastmod says:

    Fair enough.

    I met a few teachers who were honestly decent but the system around them made them shrug their shoulders and focused and did the best they could. It’s a system that breeds contempt and a lassitude in the end. Even the so called “good schools” have this problem.

    The reason why the “good schools” are doing better is not because of the teachers. Nor the Board. Nor the Union (but they will take credit for the “good school” like they always do).

    Most students in “good schools” come from homes where at least the parents / parent is making sure homework gets done. Making sure the kid comes to school fed, clothed and ready to learn. Also there are some consequences at home for bad behavior. When this balance is reached, the general school environment improves or at least is viewed as passable. The issues I mentioned above are even creeping into to these good schools. Med-time in “good surburban schools” is at a crisis level. Even “good” parents today think and believe their child can do no wrong, and when he becomes uncontrollable…..they are the ones DEMANDING the school put him on “meds” because he is uncontrollable.

    I was pulled out of public school in 1986, sent to a private. My hometown “country school” was full of “trailer trash” (for lack of a better term). The goals were to graduate, go on welfare and blame New York City for all of Upstates woes.

    Reform is almost impossible now. Even Ross Perot in the 1980’s tried in Texas to make the “no pass, no play” policy for the public schools there. Failing your subjects? No, you cannot play varsity sports….and this caused an uproar…..even from many ‘conservative’ parents.

    Like

  8. Elspeth says:

    Unless I am mistaken, Scott’s children do not attend public schools, so these are probably religious private schools or homeschool cooperative teachers sending the nasty emails. If I am correct, his report is doubly sad. These teachers have bought into the public school model, which is less about education and mostly about checking off boxes. What his kids are getting at home is far more educational.

    Our children are enrolled in a religious private school which specifically serves homeschooling families. We have missed assignments and hit snags here and there along this lock-down way, but none of the teachers have sent us nasty emails. They have all been extremely patient and gracious as I find the ordeal of scanning in assignments particularly taxing, to be honest.

    As for millennials. they do have it rough in many ways. It just doesn’t happen to be in ways that many people appreciate. Materially, they’ve had it great. But to be raised untethered from any understanding of real community, no appreciation for and few examples of healthy, lifelong marriage (often raised without a father), no religious traditions, and a society where duty is anathema and comfort is the ultimate goal? That induces severe poverty of spirit which produces a misery that is hard to describe. The fact that they are unable to identify and articulate the source of their weariness doesn’t make it less valid.

    According to Proverbs 15:16, it is much better to have very little wealth with the righteousness of God than a lot of material comforts but lives in turmoil and angst. Or something like that. I’m paraphrasing.

    Like

  9. JPF says:

    @Elspeth
    Eccl 4:6 – Better one handful with tranquility, than two handfuls with toil and chasing after the wind.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. lastmod says:

    Elspeth. Many Catholic schools and “christian” ones today TAKE state and federal money via grants, vouchers, or low interest loans from the federal / state government to build facilities or prop up their budgets, or for scholarships to disadvantaged youths…..hence they now must comply with said mandates, protocols, practices and policies.Students have to take a religion class. The standards are better than your standard public school.

    Scott can smirk all he wants about his kids getting a better education at home……they probably are. Can’t his children scan or email their own work in? If not. Teach them. Older siblings helping the younger ones with missed vocabulary words. Does he have regulations in his field? I know his wife being an RN does. She had apperwork and “boxes to check” in her demanding job that I am sure don’t require a degree in nursing….but it has to be done.

    Like

  11. Scott says:

    I had something really weird happen to me this morning.

    Hristos Voskrese!

    Like

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