God doesn’t care if you find a wife!

A wife is a stumbling block to the Americans, and foolishness to the Europeans.

Readership: Christians; Single men;

Many men have the notion that having a wife is what would make them happy.  Men stubbornly cling to this notion even though the MMP is a d@mn shambles.  Even men who escape from one horrible marriage, by hook or by crook, eagerly sign up to remarry another woman within a year or three.  Hey stupid, it wasn’t just her!  The whole market is corrupt!  And AWALT!

What does it take for a man to recover from wifitis?  Here are a few case studies for your reading intrigue.

Case Study 1 – An excerpt from Walk Two Moons

“When my mother had been there I was like a mirror. If she was happy I was happy. If she was sad I was sad. For the first few days after she left, I felt non-feeling. I didn’t know how to feel. I would find myself looking around for her to see what I might want to feel.

[…]

After the calf was born I thought, “Oh! I am happy at this moment in time!” and I was surprised that I knew this all by myself without my mother there. And that night in bed I did not cry. I said to myself, “You can be happy without her.” It seems like a mean thought to have and I was sorry for it, but it felt so true.”

~ page 35.

Growing up and realizing that you don’t need Mom to be happy is like the sudden realization that you don’t need a wife to be happy – and likewise, that you don’t need God to give you a wife in order to be happy.  A man who can get this impression may not be called to marry.

Case Study 2 — “God doesn’t care…”

Remember that time when you were a kid and your grandmother took you to the store? You were all mouth watering, and weak in the knees to have the latest G.I. Joe chronoblitzer attack module playset, complete with the fully-cloaked jettison pod, and equipped with spyder-vision tractor beams (or WeverTH it was). She looked at the exorbitant price and solemnly said, “No!”. Then you went on the warpath of dishonest discontent, saying, “Awww… You don’t reeaally looove me… You don’t reeaally caaare about me…” And at that righteous yet bewitching moment, grandma slung her lumpy, oversized purse, no doubt filled with beer bottles, bricks, an odd assortment of handtools, and a full set of Clydesdale horseshoes, to kiss your impertinent little $h!tface with the meanest left hook you never saw, sending your fat sorry @$$ sliding half-way down the floor of aisle 12. After shedding enough tears of repentance to wash the blood streak off the super-waxed floor, and mumbling “shorry mamaw…” through curds of bloody snot, she summarily dragged you out of the store by the ear – without any new toys for you to play with during your visit to her house.

…and then after returning to mamaw’s home, you found greater joys playing with your uncle’s 20-year-old toy tractors, and your cousin’s 10-year-old Tonka Trucks.

Men can be the same way about wanting a wife. I call this state, “wifitis”.

Jason wrote,

“At least part of getting better (although I still have my rough days) in this area for me was knowing in these matters… God / Jesus / the saints / angels…whatever… don’t care in these matters. They dont hem and haw over “he should have a wife”. They couldn’t care less.”

I’ll accept this as an emotional rant, because I’ve felt the same way in the past, and it proved to be an acceptance of my own hopelessness which then yielded a turn of repentance.

However, based on my experience, it is more truthful and accurate to say that “God doesn’t care as much as I do about the idolatrous things that I have mistakenly deemed to be more important than what God warrants. There must be something else that is more important to God.

But how can one make himself stop caring about his idols? e.g. porn, chivalry, oneitis, wifitis, purity culture, G.I. Joe Attack Stations, … (Insert your own vice here).

Case Study 3 – “Why do I worry so much?”

The author of Wight of Leeds hit upon the same surprising truth, as described in his post, Why do I worry so much? (April 4, 2020).

“What if I never find a wife? I’ll become a cool old bachelor. What if I find a wife, but she divorces me for a stupid reason? I’ll get over it.

[…]

None of these are workable, detailed solutions, but they’re also about as useful as worrying itself.

At the end of the day, I’m saved and God is good. Does God care if I start a band, or find a wife, or get a degree? I don’t know. Even if He doesn’t… This may sound odd, but hearing the words “God doesn’t care if you find a wife” fills me with a strange comfort, almost relief. Am I insane?

To answer the final question, I find it improbable, that any person who has ever had a real encounter with God could possibly go on about his life afterwards, without some aggrieving affliction or recurrent bouts of madness.

But does God really care or not? Is it really true, or a deceptive, feel-good lie?

As a factual statement, “God doesn’t care if I find a wife” is not true. But as a visceral confession, it expresses the freedom in Christ.

Our sexual nature is a gift from God. What you do with this gift – your sexual nature – is up to you. God gives that choice to you, and this choice is also a gift. It’s up to you what you do with that gift. Some will trade it in for wild profligacy and gain the pros and cons that come with that lifestyle. Others will cherish and preserve it, a choice also with it’s own unique set of pros and cons. (Unfortunately, it has become extremely difficult to gain the pros from the latter choice.) But whatever you choose to do with it, it’s yours – for better or for worse.

In this sense, There is no divine intervention which will coerce you to act against your will. It is that liberty in Christ which empowers our hearts.

In the sense employed by WoLs, the statement, “God doesn’t care”, is interpreted by the heart to mean, If God doesn’t care, then there is no reason to worry about this. This epiphany also excuses the mind from a false sense of responsibility — that is to say, there is no amount of thinking and worrying that will entice a virgin bride to come into your bedchamber.

But the most striking impression is one of incongruity. If you have ever pondered upon this phenomenon before, you may have already found how it is no coincidence that a bewildered mind and a peaceful heart often go hand in hand. This aspect is further explored in the next case study.

Case Study 4 – The Azmanig Mnid

I shared this puzzle with some students. The Anzamig Mnid word puzzle is in English, but the letters are transposed into anagrams.

Some students could read it, while others could not, probably due to vocabulary deficiency. But one student (who could not read it) realized a deeper spiritual truth from this meme; It is not intended for one to understand the content of the message, but to understand the purpose for sharing it. That purpose would be for fun and hope. The fun comes from mixing up the letters. The hope is inspired by the consternation of the logical mind juxtaposed onto the simple trust of sharing the message. The latter is an aspect that would be totally lost on the western mind and dismissed as foolishness, just as it says in the Bible.

“The gospel of Christ crucified is a stumbling block to the Jews, and foolishness to the Greeks.”

~ 1 Corinthians 1:23

Conclusions

Some truth is recognizable only to the heart. The mind is not capable of framing certain truths into logical statements, and even when it can, the resultant statements may not be faithfully accurate to the truth it attempts to apprehend.

When you pray, do you speak in the logical language of your mind? Or do you explore the mystical utterances of the heart? The second approach will make your prayer life explode! Pray like this and you’ll really get somewhere. I’m serious!

As for a man’s actual need for a wife, various manosphere writers have made it clearly evident that in these times, a man needs a woman like he needs a perpetual drain on his livelihood. If our merciful God truly cares, He won’t be bringing you a wife anytime before the Great Reset. But if you’re still grumbling and stumbling for a wife, then pray for God to shorten these days of tribulation for the sanctification of the libidinous elect.

Related

About Jack

Jack is a world traveling artist, skilled in trading ideas and information, none of which are considered too holy, too nerdy, nor too profane to hijack and twist into useful fashion. Sigma Frame Mindsets and methods for building and maintaining a masculine Frame
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30 Responses to God doesn’t care if you find a wife!

  1. Alfred Smith says:

    Is this some sort of Protestant satire I’m too Orthodox to understand?

    No, really. I want to know. The author can’t be serious. Or can’t be Christian. Or has made some Poe’s Law level of satire. I just want to know which one it is.

    Like

    • How so? Jesus did not insist that everybody marry.

      Like

    • Jack says:

      Alfred, welcome to Sigma Frame!
      To answer your question, the title of this particular post is rather click-baitey, but it was seriously stated in a previous comment, and I felt it had some interesting nuances that needed attention. In this post, it is assumed that God does indeed care about marriage, but ultimately, it remains for the readers to contemplate and discuss the truth of the matter among a variety of contexts.
      The first impression on the reader is how he is affected by the title. (A) Does it seem arrogantly presumptuous to speak of whether God cares about something? (B) Or do you find something curious about this statement that opens the eyes of your heart?
      The next step is in asking yourself, why should this statement affect me the way it does? If you are (A), then is it because your mind is attempting to prove or disprove the claim in the statement as either true or false? If you are (B) then what is the nature of your reaction? Is it because you wish it to be true, or because your heart has perceived it to be true?
      The four case studies are offered to help the reader sort out the possibilities.
      Case Study 1 is about emotional maturity, and being able to experience life on your own terms.
      Case Study 2 is about how people want to blame god for not giving them something in life.
      Case Study 3 is about trusting God, and the discussion is tinged with a bit of Calvinism.
      Case Study 4 is an example of how the heart and mind are unable to communicate on the same terms.
      The Conclusions have one line of sarcasm, and a funny-because-true final statement. But overall, this post is sincere in asking the above questions.

      Like

  2. Ed Hurst says:

    Paul said something similar in his letters, not as a matter of principle, but because of a historical context of high social and political instability. The same message applies to us in our current context: If you are married now, try to keep it together. If not married, this is not a good time to worry about that. Once His hand of wrath has finished its work in our time, you’ll have a better idea of how to rebuild a future that might stave off His wrath a little better. These are broad generalities; only you can know for sure what God has in mind for you.

    Like

  3. lastmod says:

    I know you took my comment out of context. I was replying to someone else. God could care less if you are married or not. He doesnt bring you the “one” and if he does? Why have marriage vows. He brought you together. Why the divirce rate with professing believers? Did god make a mistake?

    As for Ed…..and the rest of you…..if you were single and wanted to be married. I doubt you would be following what “paul said” you would be out to get married anyway or demanding / expecting god to deliver

    Like

    • Ed Hurst says:

      You are deeply mistaken, Sir. I came very close to taking the celibacy path despite plenty of willing candidates for marriage — without even a hint of Catholicism. I’ve always wanted to serve the Lord more than anything else. That’s a passion you simply don’t understand.

      Like

      • lastmod says:

        And back to the whole crux of the matter…this “meet cute” thing. I am glad you had plenty of candidates for marriage. If you didn’t, and “burned” and wanted to get married…but couldn’t find anyone……your tune would be WAY different

        Liked by 1 person

      • ramman3000 says:

        “If you didn’t, and “burned” and wanted to get married…but couldn’t find anyone……your tune would be WAY different”

        Elsewhere on this forum I was chastised for suggesting that men should learn discipline in controlling their sexual urges, as this loses the focus of what marriage should be about (from, IMO, a biblical and practical standpoint). The purpose was to focus on a godly marriage, not sex. But this is beyond the pale:

        ” I’ve always wanted to serve the Lord more than anything else. That’s a passion you simply don’t understand.”

        There is no question that the celibate life can be of great service to God, but to suggest that the married life does not also greatly serve and glorify God is deeply wrong. This has nothing to do with Jason’s rejection of Christianity.

        God is fundamentally Creator. We share that image and creative output is a defining quality of humanity. When God created man, his command was to create the union of husband and wife. He commanded that such a union would create new life. In this sense, the celibate life is sterile, which is why so few are called by God to live such a lifestyle. It is a sacrifice: it makes something sacred through a loss of something.

        What is the common Hebrew idiom used to emphasize proper obedience to God? Taking care of the widow and orphan (e.g. Isaiah 1:17 ; Jeremiah 5:28 ; Micah 2:9 ; Malachi 3:5, James 1:27), protecting that creation of marriage and family even when it breaks down.

        It is simply false that God doesn’t care if you marry. Paul’s advice must be viewed as an extension of Matthew 19:10-12, where Jesus says that only some are called to celibacy and that it should only be embraced by those who can accept it. Neither Jesus nor Paul command celibacy, because the desire for marriage and family is God-given and good. The call to marriage/family vs celibacy is not a great mystery for most people.

        Like

  4. JPF says:

    pray for God to shorten these days of tribulation for the sanctification of the libidinous elect.

    Very funny. And very appropriate, for it is written:
    8 To the unmarried and the widows I say that it is good for them to remain single, as I am. 9 But if they cannot exercise self-control, they should marry. For it is better to marry than to burn with passion.

    Jason wrote if you were single and wanted to be married. I doubt you would be following what “paul said” you would be out to get married anyway or demanding / expecting god to deliver

    I was not “demanding” anything from God, such as delivering a worthy bride by FedEx, but yes, I did want to be married, due to the emotional/sexual desires mentioned in the passage above. God does give us the freedom to pursue our desires… but I have no promise that I’ll get what I desire. In this sick, immoral culture, I think few people do. Which is no consolation to those living within it. Wish I could say something consoling to your legitimate complaints. For a couple decades I had some of your same struggles; I won’t pretend to understand all of your struggles/pains, but I do understand some.
    I thank God for the blessings he gives.

    I wonder what the results would be, if someone were to attempt to measure the long-term contentedness and general satisfaction with life, across various cultures. Would simple, low-stress, non-feminist cultures like the Amish have significantly higher values than their materialistic, feminist neighbours in the city 100 km away? (I am assuming the Amish are low-stress; feel free to correct me as appropriate.)
    Would the women in an African (and now American) culture, with complete sexual freedom, be more satisfied than the moral grandmother who stayed loyal to her man and has a lifetime of family and security? I suspect the satisfaction reported would greatly depend upon the age of the woman being asked. Ask her during her fun-filled harlotry days and you’ll likely get a different answer than the same woman gives after hitting the wall and realizing that she will be alone for the next 4 decades.

    Like

    • lastmod says:

      When I lived in India in 1997 (madras) for nine months. I saw poverty, and even many of the so-called middle class lived like the working poor in the USA. They thought they were doing well.

      Yes, that entitled incel, or angry MGTOW would and does expect a woman to show up in their lives without them having to lift a finger. I have met online many like this. No denying that.

      The crisis in the church (those who still attend) for the single man is to “god gave you this free will, and you have to use it…bench press, lead a bible study and become an engineer……” and then backhandedly “god promises you nothing. deal with it. he doesn’t fulfill your burning”

      except for some of you in here of course……………

      So since you “burned” and knew your life mission at the age of five or whatever…..and a man who burns and is 34, 44, 51, or 60…….and is in the loser class of never marrying doesn’t know his mission, didn’t bench enough…didn’t have “many options” to marry like most of you have had….

      is now told “god doesn’t owe you this”

      But he “gave” and “blessed” you with this????????

      Like

      • Jack says:

        Why do you see a contradiction there?
        Think of it in human terms. Your father doesn’t owe you an inheritance (for example), but if he gave you an inheritance, but not your brother, it would be a blessing. Wouldn’t it?

        Like

      • lastmod says:

        so if “god” the father who doesn’t owe us an inheritance (including me), gave you one……and didn’t give me one. tough breaks???

        Liked by 1 person

      • JPF says:

        Wish I could say something consoling to your legitimate complaints. For a couple decades I had some of your same struggles; I won’t pretend to understand all of your struggles/pains, but I do understand some.

        When a man admits to the legitimacy of your statements, and empathizes, this (in my mind) does not show him to be your enemy, or to be in conflict with you. I would encourage you to allow yourself to see this.

        knew your life mission at the age of five

        No. In fact, some would probably claim I still do not have a life mission. I work, give time and resources back to God, and love my wife. Nothing grand or famous in my house. If I am teaching others, fine. If I am only leading my own family, also fine.
        My lack of “big man” appearance / charisma may have contributed to me not getting much female attention. And in my view is irrelevant; if a good, even-tempered, hard-working man is not good enough for a particular set of women, then I am grateful to not have such a woman in my house. I do not accept the “game” ideals that every man needs to be a hunk / gorgeous / high-status. Good man, yes. Masculine, yes.

        “blessed” you with this?

        Yes, this is important. We have a good marriage to the extent that we obey the commands given by God. If she or I did not have the character that results from striving (imperfectly) to be obedient to God, then the marriage would suck. So, the character that we have, due to obedience to the commands God provided, is a blessing. I am most grateful for this aspect of my wife.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ramman3000 says:

        “Why do you see a contradiction there? Think of it in human terms. Your father doesn’t owe you an inheritance (for example), but if he gave you an inheritance, but not your brother, it would be a blessing. Wouldn’t it?”

        Because your scenario is unjust.

        In the parable of the workers in the vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16), the owner of the vineyard gives everyone the same reward for different amounts of work. To use your analogy, it would be as if the father only had to give the inheritance to the firstborn (or no one), but gave it to all his children out of love.

        God is generous and delights in giving good things to his people (e.g. Psalm 37:4; Matthew 7:11). Having declared that humanity should marry and have many children and extolled its benefits, it stands to reason that God actively desires that those who seek marriage accomplish their goal. To suggest that God doesn’t care about something he told people to do is callous and wrong.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jack says:

        @ Derek,
        In the parable of the workers, there were still those who felt the wages were unjust, even though everyone was paid handsomely. I believe this was the main point of this parable – that there will always be the impression that God’s generosity is interpreted as unjust by those who didn’t get as much as someone else. The error of this approach is that it is an “appeal to equality” based on “equal wages for equal works”. But in fact, the parable does describe reality, in that it creates discontent. I am certain that this is one of Jason’s running themes.
        Based on the Parable of the Talents, (Matthew 25:14-30; Luke 19:12-28), I believe God is more interested in seeing what you can do with whatever you have.

        Like

      • Sharkly says:

        So if “God” the Father who doesn’t owe us an inheritance (including me), gave you one……and didn’t give me one. tough breaks???

        Yes.

        But you also did get stuff others of us didn’t get. Why are you 6′ 4″ and I’m only 6′ 1″, Etc. We need to be content with what we have been given. It sounds like your brother got even less. Contentment with godliness is great gain. Yes it sucks to be the one who gets less, but in eternity many who were last shall be first, and many who were first shall be last. God will reward us according to how we used what we were given, our stewardship. To whom much has been given, much will be expected. If you weren’t given as much, just having a good attitude about it, can be a major victory over selfish desires. Coveting is a sin, and we should work on ridding ourselves of it. We should learn to be able to be happy when others are blessed even though we are not. This life sucks much of the time, but it is only a test, to decide where you fit in eternity. Don’t blow your test, just because somebody else seemingly is getting an easier life. They may well be going to hell for eternity. Just focus on glorifying God with what you do have and can do. There isn’t really any equality here in this life, but the Potter is free to make what He wants from the clay. Just try to be thankful for what things God did give you that he didn’t give to others. I do sympathize, and I know it is tough, but that is how it is.

        Liked by 2 people

      • ramman3000 says:

        @Sharkly

        “But you also did get stuff others of us didn’t get.”

        This is a dodge. It addresses the question “will God give every man a wife?” to which the answer is “No.” The OP question “Does God care if you get a wife?” has a different answer. God is neither vending machine nor cruel.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. bee123456 says:

    Jack,
    How is your recovery progressing? Do you think the Doctors have come up with a good treatment plan for you?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jack says:

      Bee, thanks for asking.
      The doctors made a culture and identified the infecting bacteria as a very aggressive and toxic strain of Escherichia Coli. They had to do this to find a matching antibiotic. Other antibiotics did not work. Since they identified the correct treatment, I have been slowly recovering. Because it is important to control the use of the antibiotic until the bacteria is completely destroyed, they will keep me in the hospital until Saturday.
      The results of the blood culture showed that the infection did not spread into my blood as they had feared. I suppose I can be thankful to have doctors who have the foresight of such possibilities.
      There is a third, less urgent but perhaps more important issue they are contemplating, and that is how or why I came down with this infection.
      I am really impressed with the health care system in Taiwan!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: Towards a Definition of Marriage - Derek L. Ramsey

  7. ramman3000 says:

    “In the parable of the workers, there were still those who felt the wages were unjust”

    The feelings of the participants are not relevant to the argument. Rather, let us examine the facts of the two scenarios to determine if any are unjust.

    First, in the Parable of the Workers, some workers received greater benefits, but no one was cheated. It is unfair, but it cannot be unjust. It illustrates grace.

    Second, in your example, one family member was arbitrarily given an inheritance. The father owed neither brother anything, but chose one and not the other. As Sharkly noted, ‘tough breaks’ for the person left out. This is a clear and unambiguous case of arbitrary favoritism. Absent any other qualifiers to alter the scenario, it is both unfair and unjust.

    By citing the Parable of the Workers, I am asserting that God is not capricious nor cruel. When he created man, he planned for them to marry and have children. That is the intention of creation. Yes, some people receive greater blessings than others, but no one is cheated: God still desires this for all people who seek it, even if it is not possible without overriding people’s freedom to choose good vs evil.

    By contrast, your scenario implies that God is arbitrary and doesn’t care if you follow the plan that he has laid out for people to follow. It makes God cruel, unfair, and a liar. It is no wonder that Jason rejects this portrayal of God.

    Another key difference between the two scenarios is that the former is covenantal, the latter is not.

    As an aside, consider the absurdity of saying that God doesn’t care if you get married and then stresses the importance of marriage and family (e.g. 1 Timothy 2:15).

    Like

    • Sharkly says:

      Second, in your example, one family member was arbitrarily given an inheritance. … Absent any other qualifiers to alter the scenario, it is both unfair and unjust.

      As we know, this present life is unfair. It is not unjust to give a gift or an inheritance to someone. Nor is it unjust to refrain from giving a gift or an inheritance. Some cultures stipulate that only the firstborn son gets an inheritance, or only the sons, or the sons of wives but not the sons of concubines. A wife will not be given to all men who want one, however, that does not make God unjust.
      Matthew 19:12 For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother’s womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven’s sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.

      Just because a man is not given the wife or kids that he would desire, does not make God unjust. God is just, and He made the only laws by which we should judge what is just. It is not good that the man should be alone. Likewise, it is not good that the man should be a eunuch. However God made some men eunuchs, society has made some men incels, and some men choose to function as though they were eunuchs for God’s kingdom. Right now it has been three years and two months since my wife had sex with me, meanwhile I am required to pay for her to live a life of ease, separated from me, and actively turning my sons against me. I am functioning as a eunuch, in obedience to God, and because of my wife’s disobedience to God. I don’t however call God unjust, because my current situation is greatly unfair. I will sup sorrows with the deprived, yet I still glorify God who is just and holy and above reproach.

      Liked by 2 people

      • SFC Ton says:

        There is nothing just about what you are going through

        And if she is a believer then will be no justice in the next life either becuase the Almighty will forgive her sins and she’ll be in heaven next to you.

        But there is no Biblical requirement you stay around and be her slave either

        Like

      • Sharkly says:

        And if she is a believer then will be no justice in the next life either because the Almighty will forgive her sins and she’ll be in heaven next to you.

        Not necessarily. We are told that faith without works is dead. Not everyone who hears and believes will be saved. Even the demons believe and tremble in fear. We make Jesus Christ our Lord by doing His will, and His will is the will of His Father, that we obey His commandments.
        1 John 5:3 For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments: and his commandments are not grievous.

        I don’t expect my wife will be welcome in heaven unless she turns from her wickedness and begins trying to obey God. Right now she spouts the name of Jesus while blaspheming Christ by refusing: To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands, that the word of God be not blasphemed.(Titus 2:5)
        Do not be deceived, the ungodly will not reign with Christ in heaven. We are called to suffer for Jesus Christ in this life to prove our faith.
        1 Peter 4:17 14 If you are reproached for the name of Christ, blessed are you, for the Spirit of glory and of God rests upon you. On their part He is blasphemed, but on your part He is glorified. 15 But let none of you suffer as a murderer, a thief, an evildoer, or as a busybody in other people’s matters. 16 Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in this matter. 17 For the time has come for judgment to begin at the house of God; and if it begins with us first, what will be the end of those who do not obey the gospel of God? 18 Now “If the righteous one is scarcely saved, Where will the ungodly and the sinner appear?” 19 Therefore let those who suffer according to the will of God commit their souls to Him in doing good, as to a faithful Creator.
        Only the truly repented Go to heaven, and true repentance will be evident in a person’s words and actions, and God, who knows our hearts, will judge them by their own words. My wife is openly refusing to submit to God’s word. It is not a slip up, or a failing of resolve, she is resolved to defy God and her husband and wallow in her evil bondage to sinning against us and her own children. My flesh may make mistakes, slip up and do things I regret, and sin in ignorance, but my spirit does not resolve to break God’s laws continuously like the damned. God is still just, even though He will mercifully spare us repentant ones who have noticeably turned from our sins.

        Like

      • ramman3000 says:

        “Nor is it unjust to refrain from giving a gift or an inheritance.”

        This is false. It may or may not be unjust depending on the specific qualifiers (if any) of the scenario. I explicitly said “absent any other qualifiers” because altering the scenario alters the scenario. You simply can’t ascribe my commentary to another scenario, as you’ve done here, without falsely equivocating:

        “Some cultures stipulate that only the firstborn son gets an inheritance, or only the sons, or the sons of wives but not the sons of concubines.”

        In this scenario, the choice is not arbitrary. For example, among the ancient Hebrews, the eldest received the inheritance because he was expected to head the entire family. As head of household, he was responsible for his mother, younger brothers, and unmarried sisters in the event that his father passed or was unable to fulfill his duties. A bad son squandered his inheritance.

        “A wife will not be given to all men who want one, however, that does not make God unjust.”

        I never said that God will give all men a wife, so this is also irrelevant. I—very explicitly—said that God cares if you find a wife, but does not promise you one.

        “I don’t however call God unjust, because my current situation is greatly unfair.”

        Indeed. This is why I was careful to distinguish between fairness and justice. They are different concepts. God is sometimes unfair, but he is never unjust*. Jack’s scenario cannot be used to argue that God doesn’t care if you get married or not because Jack’s scenario is unjust and God is not unjust.

        Unless you define grace and mercy as unjust.

        Like

  8. SFC Ton says:

    We live in a society that has weaponized a man’s sense of right and wrong; which punishes a man for doing “the right” thing like getting married or being the kind of man a woman should “want to” marry. And if a man should attempt those things and fail then the punishment is unrelenting and unending.

    And from all observable points of references The Alimghty is sitting this one out.

    And Chrstians would rather join a circular firing squad of hair splitting and blaming the individual man for being less than perfect then do anything useful for the guys who work hard etc and still don’t have very good prospects for the future

    Liked by 2 people

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