Personal Wealth and Service

Children and extremely poor people think that wealth and riches are the same, but they are not… There is a difference! Being rich means you have a lot of money in the bank, or valuable possessions like a nice car or a nice home. But the things that make one rich can be spent or lost.

On the other hand, personal wealth is less tangible, but more valuable. Every person has some form of wealth, whether they realize it or not. Real wealth is something you can never really lose, but you can fail to obtain the rewards of it.

So, what is your wealth?

Wealth is anything you have that other people want or need!

It may be a skill, such as Colonel Sanders’ cooking, or some knowledge, like how to make or repair something, or even just a really good idea, like Bill Gates had with the Windows OS, which allowed everyone to use the computer, instead of only technical geeks. It may even be something that you don’t think is special or valuable, but other people do!

Most people who are successful, like Colonel Sanders or Bill Gates, are people who used whatever personal wealth that they had, to meet the wants or needs of their customers or consumers. These people did not think of themselves as servants, but that is exactly what they were. They met the needs and requests of others, and received monetary compensation. By doing so, they turned their wealth into riches. Neither do people think of them as servants, but only as very rich, famous and successful men.

A lot of people envy their success, but they can’t reach the same results in life because they don’t understand the Biblical principle of service, which states, “He who serves is the greatest of all!” (Matthew 23:10-11;Mark 10:35-45; Luke 22:24-30)

Instead, most people living in the world have a false idea that servanthood is a kind of semi-voluntary slavery, and they cannot ascribe any honor or value to it. Those people do not have a Christ-like view of service, and we should not share the same. They have adopted the popular view of our culture, which dictates that “He who rules is the greatest of all!” In the flesh, this might be true, but as Christians, we should cultivate a spirit that has the power to overrule the flesh.

Understanding the Biblical Concept of Servanthood

Jesus became a servant of God, and of men, in his life and ministry on earth, but by no means did he ever give up his power or his identity. (Matthew 20:28)

Servanthood is not to be confused with the obsequious habit of “people-pleasing”, or being a “nice guy“, which lacks any purpose other than obtaining the favor of others. (Matthew 6:1-4)

The purpose of servanthood is to somehow enhance the quality and value of other peoples’ lives.

Scripture states that the righteous are those who serve God, whereas the unrighteous do not. (Malachi 3:18; Matthew 4:10)

The people being served want to have better, more joyful and more meaningful lives, and they’re even usually willing to pay for it!

So the idea that servanthood has no honor or value is completely false.

Conclusions

Paul Hewson, a very famous and successful singer, performer and political entity, once said, “The God I believe in, isn’t short on cash!”

I hope this message has thrown a new light on your own personal value.

Think about these questions for a moment…

  • What is your wealth?
  • How can you use your wealth to serve God and others in the Biblical sense?

If we have the insightful perspective to find our wealth – our usefulness to the world and to God, the humility to accept it, and the determination to achieve it, then we might also be as successful as Sanders, Gates, Hewson, or whomever you may admire for their service.

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About Jack

Jack is a world traveling artist, skilled in trading ideas and information, none of which are considered too holy, too nerdy, nor too profane to hijack and twist into useful fashion. Sigma Frame Mindsets and methods for building and maintaining a masculine Frame
This entry was posted in Building Wealth, Choosing A Profession, Maturity, Personal Growth and Development, Models of Success, Purpose and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Personal Wealth and Service

  1. Pingback: On Choosing a Career | Σ Frame

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